Friday, November 2, 2018

When 5G Isn't Quite 5G

Verizon Wireless was the first to start with what they call "5G", but it's really only a step closer.  Verizon's 5G, called "Home", is actually a slowed-down version of their ultimate high-speed Internet service.  In order to win the 5G footrace, Verizon is offering fixed wireless equipment that does not use the universally-accepted technology (3GPP), and they do not yet offer the near 5G speed standards, near 20Gbs.  Verizon does plan to pick up the speed and eventually offer the latest technology, but will need to replace customer equipment when it becomes available.

Similarly, AT&T doesn't yet offer a true 5G experience, instead, they call their high-er speed data, "5G Evolution."  That means that they're getting faster in some areas on their way to eventually offering real 5G performance.  AT&T also claims they will have 5G mobile coverage, soon.  So, there are some name games going on here.  We're trying to figure out how to respond, both on our 5G Coverage Map page, and on our new 5G web site, Mountain5G.com.

Related: 5G for You?

Sprint will eventually offer a faster data experience but they have numerous headwinds getting to that point.  T-Mobile, who has been able to expand new coverage across the country at a surprising rate, claims they will offer a hefty 5G product that will be available in several large markets soon, also available for mobile use.

Don't overlook the other 2 hurdles that must be crossed: 5G-capable devices, and that so much new wireless infrastructure is required,  with so many obstacles to building it.  We don't doubt that each of the major carriers will get there and the race to 5G does include many methods of getting us increased broadband downloads.  Enjoy the trip to fast...slowly.


3 comments:

informative resume said...

In order to fully introduce such new standards, it is necessary to completely change the infrastructure that ensures the work of the whole process.

Bill Andrews said...

Yes, you are correct. However, the average user could look at how simple the upgrade was from 3G to 4G, and then to 4G-LTE, and wonder why the upgrade to 5G isn't equally as simple. Indeed, there will be major changes and additions to infrastructure needed before 5G can be considered as available to a significant number of users.

John said...

The wavelength 5G operates on can be blocked by your hand.
It will be more marketing than practical application for years to come.